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Official CU Head Coach Search Thread

Formerly_Medford

Well-Known Member
Re the press conference… I simply can’t believe they are willing to pay $13m or so to make KD and staff go away, without having a plan to fix some institutional issues. I’m hoping they just don’t have specifics or aren’t going to publicly talk about academic transfer requirements maybe being more lenient for athletes or something.
****, Wisconsin is paying Chryst $19 million, and they're probably just going to promote Leonhard, who will just maintain the "Wisconsin way", and they'll continue to run a woefully uninspiring offense.
 

White_Rabbit

Club Member
Club Member
Not that it really matters, but maybe the Barstool account should stop posting that kind of stuff

I mean it probably doesn't help, but kinda makes me think it'd be good to keep the spotlight on the program given mf phil's comments in the press conference

We might get competent coaching, but we're forever doomed to low tier until we cut that **** out
 

Jerkass God

NeckPunchAssMunch
Club Member
Would Josh McCown be an option?
Excited No Way GIF by MLB
 

CUAviator

Well-Known Member
1) no collective
2) underfunded, poorly structured recruiting
3) anemic donor base
4) indifferent admin
5) legacy of losing
6) significant transfer impediments
it’s gonna take a special cat willing to take on these elements.
I’ve heard about the transfer impediments - can you specify those using specific facts? And compare them to, say, Stanford/UGA/North Carolina?
This is a sincere question.
 

CUAviator

Well-Known Member
I always liked the idea of hiring a coordinator looking to move up. Tucker was the right hire imo, just didn't work out. Keep trying. And also need to greatly increase the assistant coaching pool. The AD, with Univesity support, raised over $80 million for the Champions Center, the money can be there if the powers that be really want it.
@jeredough
 

CUAviator

Well-Known Member
I think it helps to consider the potential openings before considering whether certain coaches are a reach or not. The carousel can spin in uncertain ways, but I’m thinking these are the potential P5 openings:

PAC 12 - Arizona State (open). UCLA, Stanford and Cal are all possible.
Big 12 - None seem imminent that I can think of, a lot of relatively recent hires, let me know if I’m missing anyone
Big 10 - Nebraska (open). Northwestern, Indiana, and Wisconsin seem like potential openings.
SEC - Auburn will open almost for sure. Texas A&M maybe, but the great recruiting probably gives Jimbo another year.
ACC - Louisville seems like it will open. Maybe FSU.

Any obvious ones I’m missing?
Houston
Navy
USF
Michigan State

edit update: Barry Odom
 
Last edited:

HockeyBuff

Club Member
Club Member
is there no search committee????? There needs to be one IMO. someone needs to make sure this is hiring is done right. The last hire was something so many people on here predicted would end just how it ended. I hope the administration requires a search committee.
 
Last edited:

hawg1

Club Member
Club Member
I’ve heard about the transfer impediments - can you specify those using specific facts? And compare them to, say, Stanford/UGA/North Carolina?
This is a sincere question.
From elsewhere. Please delete if not OK mods.

Of 11 presented this year, 4 got green light. I don’t know comparison to other schools.

//////////

Where CU's football program runs into difficult academic hurdles is with Progress Towards Degree (PTD). For any incoming transfer student (Junior College or four-year institution), they have to meet certain degree requirements for the major they plan to pursue at CU. If they are admissible into CU but do not meet PTD, they are not eligible to compete during the season.

Most degrees require 120 units to graduate. To meet PTD, they need to meet these requirements, prior to the upcoming fall term:

Freshman (2 semesters) = 20 percent of degree completion (24 credits)

Sophomore (4 semesters) = 40 percent of degree completion (48 credits)

Junior (6 semesters) = 60 percent of degree completion (72 credits)

Senior (8 semesters) = 80 percent of degree completion (96 credits)

CU also has an institutional policy that any transfer must take 48 units at CU to obtain a degree from CU.

Because of that, any prospective transfer that is seven or eight semesters into college is immediately out of play. Even those in their sixth semester are very unlikely to meet PTD requirements, based on how CU accepts transfer credits. So they basically have to wait until graduation for the PTD requirements to go away to recruit these players. If you look at the transfers they've taken recently from the portal, you will see that reflected:
 

RollTad21

Club Member
Club Member
From elsewhere. Please delete if not OK mods.

Of 11 presented this year, 4 got green light. I don’t know comparison to other schools.

//////////

Where CU's football program runs into difficult academic hurdles is with Progress Towards Degree (PTD). For any incoming transfer student (Junior College or four-year institution), they have to meet certain degree requirements for the major they plan to pursue at CU. If they are admissible into CU but do not meet PTD, they are not eligible to compete during the season.

Most degrees require 120 units to graduate. To meet PTD, they need to meet these requirements, prior to the upcoming fall term:

Freshman (2 semesters) = 20 percent of degree completion (24 credits)

Sophomore (4 semesters) = 40 percent of degree completion (48 credits)

Junior (6 semesters) = 60 percent of degree completion (72 credits)

Senior (8 semesters) = 80 percent of degree completion (96 credits)

CU also has an institutional policy that any transfer must take 48 units at CU to obtain a degree from CU.

Because of that, any prospective transfer that is seven or eight semesters into college is immediately out of play. Even those in their sixth semester are very unlikely to meet PTD requirements, based on how CU accepts transfer credits. So they basically have to wait until graduation for the PTD requirements to go away to recruit these players. If you look at the transfers they've taken recently from the portal, you will see that reflected:
Where is this from? Not doubting you but would like to dig deeper.
 

AeroBuff99

Club Member
Club Member
From elsewhere. Please delete if not OK mods.

Of 11 presented this year, 4 got green light. I don’t know comparison to other schools.

//////////

Where CU's football program runs into difficult academic hurdles is with Progress Towards Degree (PTD). For any incoming transfer student (Junior College or four-year institution), they have to meet certain degree requirements for the major they plan to pursue at CU. If they are admissible into CU but do not meet PTD, they are not eligible to compete during the season.

Most degrees require 120 units to graduate. To meet PTD, they need to meet these requirements, prior to the upcoming fall term:

Freshman (2 semesters) = 20 percent of degree completion (24 credits)

Sophomore (4 semesters) = 40 percent of degree completion (48 credits)

Junior (6 semesters) = 60 percent of degree completion (72 credits)

Senior (8 semesters) = 80 percent of degree completion (96 credits)

CU also has an institutional policy that any transfer must take 48 units at CU to obtain a degree from CU.

Because of that, any prospective transfer that is seven or eight semesters into college is immediately out of play. Even those in their sixth semester are very unlikely to meet PTD requirements, based on how CU accepts transfer credits. So they basically have to wait until graduation for the PTD requirements to go away to recruit these players. If you look at the transfers they've taken recently from the portal, you will see that reflected:
NCAA doesn't have a requirement for freshman. You have to have 6 credits per term to be eligible for the next term. The PTD requirements though do kick in the 2nd year. See https://www.ncaa.org/sports/2021/2/10/student-athletes-current-staying-track-graduate.aspx

CU's biggest issue is that they tend to refuse to accept credits earned at other institutions, except when required by the state (aka juco credits from in state schools are required in most cases to be accepted). This has been a long standing issue, going back 20+ years. I personally know a person that was sent packing from the USAFA as a junior and tried to get into CU engineering, but the admissions department wouldn't accept many of his classes because the curriculum wasn't exactly identical or they deemed there wasn't an "equivalent" course. But his home state school, the tiny University of Michigan, had no problem transferring almost all of his credits.

So it affects normal students as well.
 

CUav8er

Club Member
Club Member
After reading through this and seeing the PTD and stuff being brought up, and the stupid ****ing attitude of our Chancellor. Please, please, please sent the CU President an email that we need to change our admission requirements to be more inline with other successful AAU schools, and that Distefano needs to be sent out to pasture, the sooner the better.
 

HockeyBuff

Club Member
Club Member
Definitely time to simplify the admissions process or could we just create a PE type of degree like other schools have???

How do Oregon, Washington, and Utah handle transfers???
 

RollTad21

Club Member
Club Member
As I said above where this same article was posted: Bull****!
I'm not so sure, historically awful current state of the program, academic restrictions that put you on an uneven playing field, and uncertainty of the conference. That is not the most appealing spot to be in. Granted, I don't believe every coach has the few quoted, but I would not be shocked if some did.
 

DBT

Club Member
Club Member
NCAA doesn't have a requirement for freshman. You have to have 6 credits per term to be eligible for the next term. The PTD requirements though do kick in the 2nd year. See https://www.ncaa.org/sports/2021/2/10/student-athletes-current-staying-track-graduate.aspx

CU's biggest issue is that they tend to refuse to accept credits earned at other institutions, except when required by the state (aka juco credits from in state schools are required in most cases to be accepted). This has been a long standing issue, going back 20+ years. I personally know a person that was sent packing from the USAFA as a junior and tried to get into CU engineering, but the admissions department wouldn't accept many of his classes because the curriculum wasn't exactly identical or they deemed there wasn't an "equivalent" course. But his home state school, the tiny University of Michigan, had no problem transferring almost all of his credits.

So it affects normal students as well.
My oldest transferred from Metro somewhere around 2006 or 2007 and was accepted into Leeds. From my understanding he would not be able to do that today. He is now a director in a large accounting firm. CU needs to get over themselves. “Formulas” are bull**** and just a way for them to make things easy for themselves.
 

Da Lama

****ty hot take machine
Club Member
NCAA doesn't have a requirement for freshman. You have to have 6 credits per term to be eligible for the next term. The PTD requirements though do kick in the 2nd year. See https://www.ncaa.org/sports/2021/2/10/student-athletes-current-staying-track-graduate.aspx

CU's biggest issue is that they tend to refuse to accept credits earned at other institutions, except when required by the state (aka juco credits from in state schools are required in most cases to be accepted). This has been a long standing issue, going back 20+ years. I personally know a person that was sent packing from the USAFA as a junior and tried to get into CU engineering, but the admissions department wouldn't accept many of his classes because the curriculum wasn't exactly identical or they deemed there wasn't an "equivalent" course. But his home state school, the tiny University of Michigan, had no problem transferring almost all of his credits.

So it affects normal students as well.
My son went through this just this year. Had to jump through fire to get certain credits transferred from a very good school. Schools like Chapman, UCSB, FSU, UT had no problem with them at all. It's ridiculous.
 

HotRack

Rez BubbleHead
Club Member
NCAA doesn't have a requirement for freshman. You have to have 6 credits per term to be eligible for the next term. The PTD requirements though do kick in the 2nd year. See https://www.ncaa.org/sports/2021/2/10/student-athletes-current-staying-track-graduate.aspx

CU's biggest issue is that they tend to refuse to accept credits earned at other institutions, except when required by the state (aka juco credits from in state schools are required in most cases to be accepted). This has been a long standing issue, going back 20+ years. I personally know a person that was sent packing from the USAFA as a junior and tried to get into CU engineering, but the admissions department wouldn't accept many of his classes because the curriculum wasn't exactly identical or they deemed there wasn't an "equivalent" course. But his home state school, the tiny University of Michigan, had no problem transferring almost all of his credits.

So it affects normal students as well.
And this is CU thinking a SERVICE ACADEMY is BENEATH their HIGH ACADEMIC STANDARDS!

What a fuucking joke CU is.

Hell, one of my twins just graduated Cum Laude with a MechE degree from the New Jersey Inst. Of Technology in NEWARK!

Guess which school between NJIT and CU is ranked higher in both USNWR and ANWR?

Yep - the school in Newark.
 

Jens1893

Moderator
Club Member
Junta Member
From Bruce Feldman. He also thinks we'll go for someone with HC experience.

Candidates with head coaching experience​

Bronco Mendenhall: Former BYU and Virginia coach Bronco Mendenhall is available. He’s a defensive-minded coach who had a solid run at Virginia after going 99-43 at BYU. He knows this region well and would feel like a pretty safe hire. Would he fire up the fan base? Probably not, but could he develop the Buffaloes into a bowl team? Probably.

Kalani Sitake: The guy who followed Mendenhall at BYU, Sitake would also make some sense. His teams are always very physical and play hard. Sitake has a strong recruiting reputation on the West Coast and in Hawaii, which is a big bonus. He also has a lot of Pac-12 experience and is doing an excellent job at his alma mater. He is 25-5 the past three years. BYU is headed to the Big 12 and that likely means more stability, or at least certainty, in Provo than Boulder. Would he be tempted to leave what he has for Colorado? We’re skeptical, but the Buffaloes should at least ask.

Troy Calhoun: The Air Force coach, 56, knows the area very well from his time at the Academy and as a Denver Broncos assistant. He’s a creative offensive mind and a consistent winner. In the past four seasons, he’s 28-9.

Justin Wilcox: An Oregon native, Wilcox is only 29-30 at Cal but that is a very challenging Pac-12 job for all sorts of reasons. Because of that, we think he might be open to making this move if CU makes a real push for him.

Jeff Choate: The Texas assistant, a Chris Petersen protege, did well as an FCS coach in the region, going 11-4 at Montana State in his fourth season there after revitalizing that program and leading it to the FCS semifinals. He knows the Pac-12 well from stints at Washington State and Washington.
Bryan Harsin: Another former Petersen assistant, Auburn head coach Harsin might merit a look. It seems like a long shot he’s going to be in the SEC much longer. He’s 9-9 in a year and a half at a place where most of the key Auburn folks never wanted him in the first place. If and when Harsin gets pushed out, he might be worth a look in Boulder. He led Boise State to four Top 25 seasons in seven years there.
Ricky Rahne: Old Dominion’s head coach, a Colorado native, doesn’t have a ton of head coaching experience. He also doesn’t have a winning record at the Sun Belt school, going 8-10 so far, but he led the school to a bowl in his first year and then to a win over Virginia Tech in the opener this season. The former Penn State OC is expected to at least get some consideration, but obviously it’d help his cause a lot if the Monarchs, 2-3, can start piling up some wins. Knocking off Sun Belt power Coastal Carolina on the road in their next game would be a nice start.

Assistant coaches who could be strong candidates​

Ryan Walters: The Illinois defensive coordinator is a former Colorado player and staffer. Since those days, the 36-year-old has worked his way up in the coaching world and is now playing a key role in Illinois’ rise. His defense is No. 3 in the country. Before he arrived two seasons ago, the Illini ranked No. 108. He’s good and ready to be a candidate at his alma mater.
Jeff Grimes: The Baylor offensive coordinator did a terrific job at BYU, improving an offense that had ranked No. 78 in yards per play in 2018 and ranked No. 1 in the country in 2020. He then took a Baylor offense that was ranked No. 125 and got the Bears up to No. 33. He was a finalist for the Utah State coaching vacancy two years ago and we hear he impressed in that process, but Utah State liked Blake Anderson’s head coaching experience. Grimes has only ascended since then. He is very well-regarded as a game planner and his big presence exudes leadership and confidence.
Tony Alford: Ohio State’s run game coordinator played at rival CSU and has helped Notre Dame and Ohio State elevate and stay at a high level over the past decade. He’s been a key piece to the Buckeyes explosive offense but might be more likely to get a longer look at the Group of 5 level than in Boulder.
Eric Bieniemy: A wild-card name to watch here is former Colorado star Bieniemy, the Kansas City Chiefs OC. The 53-year-old, who went to high school in Southern California, has been a Buffaloes assistant on two separate occasions. He had a strong reputation as a recruiter back then. He’s been a valuable assistant for the Chiefs in their rise over the past decade.
He has been unable to get an NFL head coaching job and might be more inclined to take his shot at running a program at his alma mater after years as a top assistant waiting for his chance. According to a source, he did turn down around $4 million a year the last time his alma mater was looking for a new coach. If Colorado tries to hire him now, he might be more ready to take it.
 

The Alabaster Yak

Club Member
Club Member
From Bruce Feldman. He also thinks we'll go for someone with HC experience.

Candidates with head coaching experience​

Bronco Mendenhall: Former BYU and Virginia coach Bronco Mendenhall is available. He’s a defensive-minded coach who had a solid run at Virginia after going 99-43 at BYU. He knows this region well and would feel like a pretty safe hire. Would he fire up the fan base? Probably not, but could he develop the Buffaloes into a bowl team? Probably.

Kalani Sitake: The guy who followed Mendenhall at BYU, Sitake would also make some sense. His teams are always very physical and play hard. Sitake has a strong recruiting reputation on the West Coast and in Hawaii, which is a big bonus. He also has a lot of Pac-12 experience and is doing an excellent job at his alma mater. He is 25-5 the past three years. BYU is headed to the Big 12 and that likely means more stability, or at least certainty, in Provo than Boulder. Would he be tempted to leave what he has for Colorado? We’re skeptical, but the Buffaloes should at least ask.

Troy Calhoun: The Air Force coach, 56, knows the area very well from his time at the Academy and as a Denver Broncos assistant. He’s a creative offensive mind and a consistent winner. In the past four seasons, he’s 28-9.

Justin Wilcox: An Oregon native, Wilcox is only 29-30 at Cal but that is a very challenging Pac-12 job for all sorts of reasons. Because of that, we think he might be open to making this move if CU makes a real push for him.

Jeff Choate: The Texas assistant, a Chris Petersen protege, did well as an FCS coach in the region, going 11-4 at Montana State in his fourth season there after revitalizing that program and leading it to the FCS semifinals. He knows the Pac-12 well from stints at Washington State and Washington.
Bryan Harsin: Another former Petersen assistant, Auburn head coach Harsin might merit a look. It seems like a long shot he’s going to be in the SEC much longer. He’s 9-9 in a year and a half at a place where most of the key Auburn folks never wanted him in the first place. If and when Harsin gets pushed out, he might be worth a look in Boulder. He led Boise State to four Top 25 seasons in seven years there.
Ricky Rahne: Old Dominion’s head coach, a Colorado native, doesn’t have a ton of head coaching experience. He also doesn’t have a winning record at the Sun Belt school, going 8-10 so far, but he led the school to a bowl in his first year and then to a win over Virginia Tech in the opener this season. The former Penn State OC is expected to at least get some consideration, but obviously it’d help his cause a lot if the Monarchs, 2-3, can start piling up some wins. Knocking off Sun Belt power Coastal Carolina on the road in their next game would be a nice start.

Assistant coaches who could be strong candidates​

Ryan Walters: The Illinois defensive coordinator is a former Colorado player and staffer. Since those days, the 36-year-old has worked his way up in the coaching world and is now playing a key role in Illinois’ rise. His defense is No. 3 in the country. Before he arrived two seasons ago, the Illini ranked No. 108. He’s good and ready to be a candidate at his alma mater.
Jeff Grimes: The Baylor offensive coordinator did a terrific job at BYU, improving an offense that had ranked No. 78 in yards per play in 2018 and ranked No. 1 in the country in 2020. He then took a Baylor offense that was ranked No. 125 and got the Bears up to No. 33. He was a finalist for the Utah State coaching vacancy two years ago and we hear he impressed in that process, but Utah State liked Blake Anderson’s head coaching experience. Grimes has only ascended since then. He is very well-regarded as a game planner and his big presence exudes leadership and confidence.
Tony Alford: Ohio State’s run game coordinator played at rival CSU and has helped Notre Dame and Ohio State elevate and stay at a high level over the past decade. He’s been a key piece to the Buckeyes explosive offense but might be more likely to get a longer look at the Group of 5 level than in Boulder.
Eric Bieniemy: A wild-card name to watch here is former Colorado star Bieniemy, the Kansas City Chiefs OC. The 53-year-old, who went to high school in Southern California, has been a Buffaloes assistant on two separate occasions. He had a strong reputation as a recruiter back then. He’s been a valuable assistant for the Chiefs in their rise over the past decade.
He has been unable to get an NFL head coaching job and might be more inclined to take his shot at running a program at his alma mater after years as a top assistant waiting for his chance. According to a source, he did turn down around $4 million a year the last time his alma mater was looking for a new coach. If Colorado tries to hire him now, he might be more ready to take it.
Sitake?? Uhh yes please. Would take Wilcox in a heartbeat as well. Honestly, pretty much everyone there would be solid, some more exciting than others of course.
 

JMBuffs

Well-Known Member
I'd caution missing out on Walters because he is a CU alum and young. I keep hearing he's "a couple years away" and carries the stigma of having an obviously strong connection to CU. **** that, the dude can coach. Let's lock up one of the hottest coaches in CFB right now and just be done with it for ****s sake.
 

PhillyBuff

Club Member
Club Member
From Bruce Feldman. He also thinks we'll go for someone with HC experience.

Candidates with head coaching experience​

Bronco Mendenhall: Former BYU and Virginia coach Bronco Mendenhall is available. He’s a defensive-minded coach who had a solid run at Virginia after going 99-43 at BYU. He knows this region well and would feel like a pretty safe hire. Would he fire up the fan base? Probably not, but could he develop the Buffaloes into a bowl team? Probably.

Kalani Sitake: The guy who followed Mendenhall at BYU, Sitake would also make some sense. His teams are always very physical and play hard. Sitake has a strong recruiting reputation on the West Coast and in Hawaii, which is a big bonus. He also has a lot of Pac-12 experience and is doing an excellent job at his alma mater. He is 25-5 the past three years. BYU is headed to the Big 12 and that likely means more stability, or at least certainty, in Provo than Boulder. Would he be tempted to leave what he has for Colorado? We’re skeptical, but the Buffaloes should at least ask.

Troy Calhoun: The Air Force coach, 56, knows the area very well from his time at the Academy and as a Denver Broncos assistant. He’s a creative offensive mind and a consistent winner. In the past four seasons, he’s 28-9.

Justin Wilcox: An Oregon native, Wilcox is only 29-30 at Cal but that is a very challenging Pac-12 job for all sorts of reasons. Because of that, we think he might be open to making this move if CU makes a real push for him.

Jeff Choate: The Texas assistant, a Chris Petersen protege, did well as an FCS coach in the region, going 11-4 at Montana State in his fourth season there after revitalizing that program and leading it to the FCS semifinals. He knows the Pac-12 well from stints at Washington State and Washington.
Bryan Harsin: Another former Petersen assistant, Auburn head coach Harsin might merit a look. It seems like a long shot he’s going to be in the SEC much longer. He’s 9-9 in a year and a half at a place where most of the key Auburn folks never wanted him in the first place. If and when Harsin gets pushed out, he might be worth a look in Boulder. He led Boise State to four Top 25 seasons in seven years there.
Ricky Rahne: Old Dominion’s head coach, a Colorado native, doesn’t have a ton of head coaching experience. He also doesn’t have a winning record at the Sun Belt school, going 8-10 so far, but he led the school to a bowl in his first year and then to a win over Virginia Tech in the opener this season. The former Penn State OC is expected to at least get some consideration, but obviously it’d help his cause a lot if the Monarchs, 2-3, can start piling up some wins. Knocking off Sun Belt power Coastal Carolina on the road in their next game would be a nice start.

Assistant coaches who could be strong candidates​

Ryan Walters: The Illinois defensive coordinator is a former Colorado player and staffer. Since those days, the 36-year-old has worked his way up in the coaching world and is now playing a key role in Illinois’ rise. His defense is No. 3 in the country. Before he arrived two seasons ago, the Illini ranked No. 108. He’s good and ready to be a candidate at his alma mater.
Jeff Grimes: The Baylor offensive coordinator did a terrific job at BYU, improving an offense that had ranked No. 78 in yards per play in 2018 and ranked No. 1 in the country in 2020. He then took a Baylor offense that was ranked No. 125 and got the Bears up to No. 33. He was a finalist for the Utah State coaching vacancy two years ago and we hear he impressed in that process, but Utah State liked Blake Anderson’s head coaching experience. Grimes has only ascended since then. He is very well-regarded as a game planner and his big presence exudes leadership and confidence.
Tony Alford: Ohio State’s run game coordinator played at rival CSU and has helped Notre Dame and Ohio State elevate and stay at a high level over the past decade. He’s been a key piece to the Buckeyes explosive offense but might be more likely to get a longer look at the Group of 5 level than in Boulder.
Eric Bieniemy: A wild-card name to watch here is former Colorado star Bieniemy, the Kansas City Chiefs OC. The 53-year-old, who went to high school in Southern California, has been a Buffaloes assistant on two separate occasions. He had a strong reputation as a recruiter back then. He’s been a valuable assistant for the Chiefs in their rise over the past decade.
He has been unable to get an NFL head coaching job and might be more inclined to take his shot at running a program at his alma mater after years as a top assistant waiting for his chance. According to a source, he did turn down around $4 million a year the last time his alma mater was looking for a new coach. If Colorado tries to hire him now, he might be more ready to take it.
I like this list except in leaves off Tom Herman. I really think he can be successful here. Is there a reason why he didn't make the cut?
 

The Alabaster Yak

Club Member
Club Member
I'd caution missing out on Walters because he is a CU alum and young. I keep hearing he's "a couple years away" and carries the stigma of having an obviously strong connection to CU. **** that, the dude can coach. Let's lock up one of the hottest coaches in CFB right now and just be done with it for ****s sake.
I would like him to be in consideration and if he is truly the best candidate who wants to job and understands the challenges, I would be on board with him.
 
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