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NIL act passed - NCAA allows athletes to monetise their name, image, likeness

CarolinaBuff

Club Member
Club Member
He can walk it back for the public. The real question is: what kind of $$$ did he raise from that luncheon?


Exactly. Saban knows the deep pockets that the A&M boosters have and the 5-star numbers that brock posted above are no coincidence. And that's ok in today's world of college football given the lack of rules around NIL.

I don't get why Jimbo gets so ticked off about it when coaches like Kiffen and Saban basically say that A&M is offering more money than everyone else. They probably are! Jimbo should be using that to his advantage to continue get 4 and 5-star players to come to his program.
 

manhattanbuff

Club Member
Club Member
Exactly. Saban knows the deep pockets that the A&M boosters have and the 5-star numbers that brock posted above are no coincidence. And that's ok in today's world of college football given the lack of rules around NIL.

I don't get why Jimbo gets so ticked off about it when coaches like Kiffen and Saban basically say that A&M is offering more money than everyone else. They probably are! Jimbo should be using that to his advantage to continue get 4 and 5-star players to come to his program.
Jimbo is using it to his advantage. He just wants to do it privately for some weird reason.
 

GawainBuff

Club Member
Club Member
Exactly. Saban knows the deep pockets that the A&M boosters have and the 5-star numbers that brock posted above are no coincidence. And that's ok in today's world of college football given the lack of rules around NIL.

I don't get why Jimbo gets so ticked off about it when coaches like Kiffen and Saban basically say that A&M is offering more money than everyone else. They probably are! Jimbo should be using that to his advantage to continue get 4 and 5-star players to come to his program.


According to Cravens, the only schools that didn't offer him money were from the Pac-12. He claims that's because Pac-12 schools would've received "the death penalty."


Cravens claims some schools offered him over $10,000 just to come down for a visit.

"I had schools offering me 10-20k just to visit and all of em were south east of Texas since people lying I’ll speak from experience," he added. "Recruiting was unfair up until NIL because only the SEC was allowed to openly pay for talent which is why they became so dominant last 13 years."
 

MtnBuff

Not allowed in Barzil 2
Club Member
Jimbo is using it to his advantage. He just wants to do it privately for some weird reason.
Jimbo going to use this to convince the boosters that Bama is coming after them and the only way to get and stay on top is for them up the amount of money they are putting in.
 

GawainBuff

Club Member
Club Member

According to Cravens, the only schools that didn't offer him money were from the Pac-12. He claims that's because Pac-12 schools would've received "the death penalty."


Cravens claims some schools offered him over $10,000 just to come down for a visit.

"I had schools offering me 10-20k just to visit and all of em were south east of Texas since people lying I’ll speak from experience," he added. "Recruiting was unfair up until NIL because only the SEC was allowed to openly pay for talent which is why they became so dominant last 13 years."

The most galling part of this is that nothing will ever be done about it. I don't know how true Craven's allegations are (could there be a better name to raise this issue?), but it certainly should be the subject of full investigation--with teeth: illegal money has altered the landscape of the sport, skewing the very nature of the competition away from the on-field events and into smoke-filled back rooms, reeking of mob-like racketeering. That's where the winners and losers have been made.

If true (and it seems far more likely than not), the SEC (and whomever else has been doing this) has become the predominate power in the most lucrative college sport (ever) through decades of systematic cheating; this would be far worse than any performance enhancing drug scheme, even beyond the Armstrong "peloton" and the coopting of the enforcement entities or major league baseball. Congress held hearings and got involved in those (the reasons for doing so were certainly not pristine, of course).

And the incessant drumbeat of commentators--who make money as the system grows--thrums away, this is always how it has been. As long as the advertising dollars flow in, nothing will change? There's too much money involved to ever take a genuinely close look at the details of what's been going on. Frankly, the PAC12 should have sued the NCAA and the SEC a long time ago for systemic fraud, racketeering, bribery, and breaches of contract, etc. Of course, they would never do that, as it would look bad and adversely impact their own increasingly meager piece of the pie. (I'm sure there are some serious legal hurdles to overcome in the manner by which the system is set up in the first place, making such a suit either impractical or improper. It would clearly be an insanely complicated, decades-long litigation, wherein the SEC's best defense might well be unclean hands, and the PAC12 is, I'm sure, well aware of its own issues. It's just a frustrated thought.)

For me, this sort of problem stretches well beyond sport: the SEC (or the whole of CFA) being simply, too big to fail--or even investigate in any real way. So instead, let's exalt the greatness of the cheaters and revel in their successful take-over of the sport.

It's deeply frustrating, as this is simply not how a society of rules and laws is supposed to work. But money has been shown, over and over again, to trump accountability. Those willing to do these things know that going in.
 
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manhattanbuff

Club Member
Club Member
The most galling part of this is that nothing will ever be done about it. I don't know how true Craven's allegations are (could there be a better name to raise this issue?), but it certainly should be the subject of full investigation--with teeth: illegal money has altered the landscape of the sport, skewing the very nature of the competition away from the on-field events and into smoke-filled back rooms, reeking of mob-like racketeering. That's where the winners and losers have been made.

If true (and it seems far more likely than not), the SEC (and whomever else has been doing this) has become the predominate power in the most lucrative college sport (ever) through decades of systematic cheating; this would be far worse than any performance enhancing drug scheme, even beyond the Armstrong "peloton" and the coopting of the enforcement entities or major league baseball. Congress held hearings and got involved in those (the reasons for doing so were certainly not pristine, of course).

And the incessant drumbeat of commentators--who make money as the system grows--thrums away, this is always how it has been. As long as the advertising dollars flow in, nothing will change? There's too much money involved to ever take a genuinely close look at the details of what's been going on. Frankly, the PAC12 should have sued the NCAA and the SEC a long time ago for systemic fraud, racketeering, bribery, and breaches of contract, etc. Of course, they would never do that, as it would look bad and adversely impact their own increasingly meager piece of the pie. (I'm sure there are some serious legal hurdles to overcome in the manner by which the system is set up in the first place, making such a suit either impractical or improper. It would clearly be an insanely complicated, decades-long litigation, wherein the SEC's best defense might well be unclean hands, and the PAC12 is, I'm sure, well aware of its own issues. It's just a frustrated thought.)

For me, this sort of problem stretches well beyond sport: the SEC (or the whole of CFA) being simply, too big to fail--or even investigate in any real way. So instead, let's exalt the greatness of the cheaters and revel in their successful take-over of the sport.

It's deeply frustrating, as this is simply not how a society of rules and laws is supposed to work. But money has been shown, over and over again, to trump accountability. Those willing to do these things know that going in.
Unclear how to interpret any lawsuit’s basis when the rule that was being breached was decidedly illegal.
 

GawainBuff

Club Member
Club Member
Unclear how to interpret any lawsuit’s basis when the rule that was being breached was decidedly illegal.
I agree, and there are far more issues/rules at play than the one that was directly litigated and decided:

“Justice Neil Gorsuch authored the majority opinion in favor of the plaintiffs, albeit a narrow decision dealing only with education-related benefits and not the larger issue of pay-for-play or other big-picture issues with college athletes.”

 
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manhattanbuff

Club Member
Club Member
I agree, and there are far more issues/rules at play than the one that was directly litigated and decided:

“Justice Neil Gorsuch authored the majority opinion in favor of the plaintiffs, albeit a narrow decision dealing only with education-related benefits and not the larger issue of pay-for-play or other big-picture issues with college athletes.”

Yes, Gorsuch authored the primary opinion. However, the other justices indicated that the NCAA should not enforce other payment limit rules, else they face other anti-trust suits that they’d likely lose. Kavanaugh was more direct about that statement, though most folks don’t think he spoke out of turn.
 

steph

Well-Known Member
Jumbo has the all star recruiting class this year, but he will develop those guys for a year or two and half of the 4-5 star guys will be gone to other programs willing to pay more for their services. As this plays out the importance of the incoming freshman class is going to mean less than the group of proven, ready to play athletes a program can buy.
 

PAHIBuff

It's a big world in Bakersfield
Club Member
Jimbo is starting to go off the rails. He gets contentious in this interview with a news reporter from SA and tells a female in the backround "Just let me handle this" at about the 3:00 mark

That's one loopy MFer. He's about 2 weeks from blowin' a gasket.
 

SpacemanSpiff

Be curious, not judgmental
Club Member
Jumbo has the all star recruiting class this year, but he will develop those guys for a year or two and half of the 4-5 star guys will be gone to other programs willing to pay more for their services. As this plays out the importance of the incoming freshman class is going to mean less than the group of proven, ready to play athletes a program can buy.
You don’t think A&M can pay like other programs can? Isn’t the point that pay is why they chose A&M to start with?
 

Hi.O

Well-Known Member
Jumbo has the all star recruiting class this year, but he will develop those guys for a year or two and half of the 4-5 star guys will be gone to other programs willing to pay more for their services. As this plays out the importance of the incoming freshman class is going to mean less than the group of proven, ready to play athletes a program can buy.
Don't some NIL deals buy up the athlete's NIL rights? If A&M is spending that kind of money, they're probably locking that up.
 

CarolinaBuff

Club Member
Club Member
Interesting thread here, if you don't want to read thru it the summary is that the founder of an NIL agency was offering players $500/week to spend 15 minutes on their podcast. They reached out to some A&M players and they said they were getting $5K/week to do a 2-minute spot on local radio. Things are different in College Station.


 

CUAviator

Well-Known Member
Interesting thread here, if you don't want to read thru it the summary is that the founder of an NIL agency was offering players $500/week to spend 15 minutes on their podcast. They reached out to some A&M players and they said they were getting $5K/week to do a 2-minute spot on local radio. Things are different in College Station.


This is what I keep thinking. How long can a car dealership in Austin offer every OL at UT $125,000/year?
 

DBT

Club Member
Club Member
I find some of the pearl clutching by some in the media bit annoying given how many of them were hand waving away the concerns many fans had with how damaging these unregulated changes were going to be for the sport. Particularly ESPN which has really damaged the sport by pumping their house league.
The comments to that tweet are predictable. Lots of old guys saying that “they” don’t deserve that kind of money and telling stories of “Back in my day….”
So!?
 

DBT

Club Member
Club Member
There are three types of college sports fans. Fans with a rooting interest in a program, fans that enjoy the sport no matter who’s playing and gamblers.

Under the current NIL system the group that will be negatively impacted the most are the fans with a rooting interest. I can envision game attendance dwindling for the “have not” programs.

At some point the NIL era will sort of seek its own level, like water. Parity was gone long before NIL. But I still held out hope that CU could occasionally compete for a Pac 12 Championship maybe. Now I don’t even have that. For football at least. Dynamics for basketball are a little different but even in basketball NIL is having an impact.

Im fortunate that I experienced college football when parity was still a thing up until around the end of the 20th Century, :LOL:
 

The Alabaster Yak

Club Member
Club Member
There are three types of college sports fans. Fans with a rooting interest in a program, fans that enjoy the sport no matter who’s playing and gamblers.

Under the current NIL system the group that will be negatively impacted the most are the fans with a rooting interest. I can envision game attendance dwindling for the “have not” programs.

At some point the NIL era will sort of seek its own level, like water. Parity was gone long before NIL. But I still held out hope that CU could occasionally compete for a Pac 12 Championship maybe. Now I don’t even have that. For football at least. Dynamics for basketball are a little different but even in basketball NIL is having an impact.

Im fortunate that I experienced college football when parity was still a thing up until around the end of the 20th Century, :LOL:
Right, which is why despite some people believing a super conference with all star teams will generate big ratings, I believe that over time, ratings will actually decline. The NFL will always be the premier football league and the only people who will care about the semi pro league will be the ones whose teams are still part of it and the gamblers. The rest (two thirds of the P5??) will be casual watchers of that league, at best.
 

BlackNGold

Club Member
There are three types of college sports fans. Fans with a rooting interest in a program, fans that enjoy the sport no matter who’s playing and gamblers.

Under the current NIL system the group that will be negatively impacted the most are the fans with a rooting interest. I can envision game attendance dwindling for the “have not” programs.

At some point the NIL era will sort of seek its own level, like water. Parity was gone long before NIL. But I still held out hope that CU could occasionally compete for a Pac 12 Championship maybe. Now I don’t even have that. For football at least. Dynamics for basketball are a little different but even in basketball NIL is having an impact.

Im fortunate that I experienced college football when parity was still a thing up until around the end of the 20th Century, :LOL:
I agree with most of what you say, but I will point out the general direction of CU Football has been downward even before NIL. We have been hanging around the bottom of the conference on the field and in recruiting rankings (I do know that stars don't matter). NIL and Transfer portal are putting nails in the coffin but the coffin was already there for CU football.
 

steph

Well-Known Member
You don’t think A&M can pay like other programs can? Isn’t the point that pay is why they chose A&M to start with?
Now A&M is throwing out all this money but at some point the amount of money a program has to spend is finite. Spending that kind of money to bring in a bunch of freshman that may not produce for a year or two is a gamble when as far as I know to become a free agent all the athlete has to do is put himself in the portal. Another program may not be able to compete with A&M in overall spending, but 10 different teams could each poach a player once proven in a year or 2. Might be more successful to spend money that way.
 
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